Hike Into 2022

Hike Into 2022

Join Uloha as we hike into the New Year by exploring Oahu's State Parks. 

Most of the state parks on O‘ahu protect natural areas and provide an opportunity for people to enjoy them. The biggest difference between a state park and a recreation area (see below) is infrastructure – state parks tend to be more strictly managed and provide more amenities, like bathrooms, campgrounds, picnic areas, bird sanctuaries, etc. (this is not true in all cases, but generally speaking).

Visit the following State Parks, snap a photo of yourself on the trail, and submit your entries (use this link) by 1/31/22 to get hooked up with the goods. 

KAʻENA POINT STATE PARK

Park Description and Highlights: Kaʻena Point State Park occupies the northwest corner of O‘ahu, with access points from both the north shore and the leeward side. It is a wonderful out-of-the-way recreation area, with opportunities for whale watching (Nov-Mar), hiking, snorkeling, fishing, and exploring tide pools. The Hawaiian monk seal is also known to rest in this area.

AHUPUAʻA ʻO KAHANA STATE PARK

Park Description and Highlights: Ahupuaʻa ʻO Kahana State Park, better and more casually known as Kahana Valley, is tucked away on the rural Windwardside, about 30 minutes north of Kanehoe.

HEʻEIA STATE PARK

Park Description and Highlights: Heʻeia State Park sits on the northern edge of Kaneohe. A small peninsula, it juts out into Kaneohe Bay, providing really nice views of the bay and the windward coastline. It is small and well-regulated, with a closed-in pavilion, visitor’s kiosk, bathrooms, and event space.

KE’EHI LAGOON MEMORIAL STATE PARK

Park Description and Highlights: Ke’ehi Lagoon Memorial State Park is a small, green park in between downtown and the airport. Local paddling groups launch from here, and there are tennis courts as well as open green space, picnic tables, and a curvy, sandy beach. The water is protected and calm, making it a popular after-work spot for locals.